Volume 4, Issue 5, September 2019, Page: 87-90
Bacteriology of Peritonitis in Children Treated at the University Hospital of Marrakech
Taoufik Rokni, Department of Microbiology, Mohammed VI University Hospital, Cadi Ayyad University, Marrakech, Morocco
Adil Rabi, Department of Microbiology, Mohammed VI University Hospital, Cadi Ayyad University, Marrakech, Morocco
Nabila Soraa, Department of Microbiology, Mohammed VI University Hospital, Cadi Ayyad University, Marrakech, Morocco
Hassan Ait Bahssain, Department of Pediatric Anesthesia-reanimation, Mohammed VI University Hospital, Cadi Ayyad University, Marrakech, Morocco
Younous Said, Department of Pediatric Anesthesia-reanimation, Mohammed VI University Hospital, Cadi Ayyad University, Marrakech, Morocco
Tarik Salama, Department of Pediatric Anesthesia-reanimation, Mohammed VI University Hospital, Cadi Ayyad University, Marrakech, Morocco
Fouraiji Karima, Department of Pediatric Surgery, Mohammed VI University Hospital, Cadi Ayyad University, Marrakech, Morocco
Kamili El Ouafi El Aouni, Department of Pediatric Surgery, Mohammed VI University Hospital, Cadi Ayyad University, Marrakech, Morocco
Oulad Saiad Mohamed, Department of Pediatric Surgery, Mohammed VI University Hospital, Cadi Ayyad University, Marrakech, Morocco
Received: Sep. 7, 2019;       Accepted: Sep. 24, 2019;       Published: Oct. 17, 2019
DOI: 10.11648/j.ajlm.20190405.12      View  40      Downloads  19
Abstract
Child peritonitis are severe intra-abdominal infections, involving vital prognosis. The available microbiological data of peritonitis in children are inadequate, and antibiotic therapy is not consensual. Description of the bacteriological profile and the antibiotic resistance of the isolated bacteria in the various samples of peritoneal fluid from the different departments of the University Hospital of Marrakech. It is a descriptive study spread over two years. carried out at the Laboratory of Microbiology of the Mohamed VI Hospital of Marrakech (CHU MED VI), covering all the bacterial strains, isolated in the peritoneal fluid samples from the various pediatric departments of the University Hospital. During this period, 92 samples were treated in the laboratory with a positivity rate of 80%. The average age of his children is 11.7 years with a sex ratio of 1.4. The infection was polymicrobial in 40%. Escherichia. coli dominated the bacteriological profile of these peritonitis in 74% of cases, followed by Streptococcus spp (30%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (18%), Enterobacter cloacae (6%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (1%). The susceptibility to amoxicillin in enterobacteria isolated from peritonitis was 32%, 68% for amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, 92% for 3rd generation cephalosporins, 97% for fluoroquinolones, 67% for cotrimoxazole and 89% for gentamycin. Only one strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was resistant to ceftazidime. All strains remained sensitive to amikacin and carbapenems. Resistance of Enterobacteria to 3rd generation cephalosporins by the production of Extended Spectrum Betalactamase (ESBL) in the isolates was 4%. This prompts us to reconsider our therapeutic approach. We believe that the association C3G + aminoglycoside + metronidazole should be used first-line in severe pediatric peritonitis in our context. The quick initiation of an antibiotic therapy adapted to the resistance profile would be an important factor in improving the prognosis, hence the interest of close collaboration between surgeons, anesthesiologist-intensive care and microbiologists.
Keywords
Peritonitis, Antibiotherapy, Pediatrics
To cite this article
Taoufik Rokni, Adil Rabi, Nabila Soraa, Hassan Ait Bahssain, Younous Said, Tarik Salama, Fouraiji Karima, Kamili El Ouafi El Aouni, Oulad Saiad Mohamed, Bacteriology of Peritonitis in Children Treated at the University Hospital of Marrakech, American Journal of Laboratory Medicine. Vol. 4, No. 5, 2019, pp. 87-90. doi: 10.11648/j.ajlm.20190405.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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