Volume 4, Issue 2, March 2019, Page: 48-52
Distributional Patterns of ABO Blood Grouping and Rhesus Factor: Retrospective Cross-Sectional Study in Somali Regional Blood Bank
Abibakar Sheikaden Ismail, Public Health Department, Jigjiga University, Jiggjiga, Ethiopia
Received: Mar. 4, 2019;       Accepted: Apr. 11, 2019;       Published: May 31, 2019
DOI: 10.11648/j.ajlm.20190402.15      View  86      Downloads  20
Abstract
Blood is the most important body fluid. It is responsible for the transportation of the most critical substance, oxygen. The human red blood cell membrane contains different types of antigens, called agglutinogens. These antigens are capable of inducing specific immune response which in turn results in the production of antibodies. From the thirty blood group system genes already identified, the most important blood group systems are the ABO and Rh. Frequency of the four main ABO blood groups vary throughout the world mainly due to differences in geographical location and ethnicity. The aim of this study was to describe the distributional patterns of ABO blood grouping and Rh factor in Somali Regional State. A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted in the blood bank from January 1 to February 10, 2019. Sample of three years (2015 to 2017) data was collected purposively. Data collectors were oriented prior to data collection and the study tool was pre-tested for corrections if any. Data processing and descriptive data analysis was undertaken by employing Microsoft Excel 2013 and SPSS 20. Ethical clearance letter was obtained from the Somali Regional Health Bureau and it was presented to the study facility. Blood group O has the highest frequency, 2,310 (50.10%) followed by blood group A, 1,366 (29.60%); B 702 (15.20%) and AB 236 (5.10%). The overall Rhesus factor positivity and negativity was 4,410 (95.6%) and 204 (4.4%) respectively. Blood group O is the most frequent blood type among blood donors in Somali region. Then, followed by A, B, and AB blood types. Absolute majority of blood donors in the region have Rh positive gene in the surface of their RBCs. Contact details of blood donors with rare blood types should be retained for tracking in cases of emergency blood donation requests. Concerned bodies at different levels should use findings from this study for planning and blood bank management.
Keywords
Distributional Patterns, ABO Blood Grouping, Rh Factor, Somali Region
To cite this article
Abibakar Sheikaden Ismail, Distributional Patterns of ABO Blood Grouping and Rhesus Factor: Retrospective Cross-Sectional Study in Somali Regional Blood Bank, American Journal of Laboratory Medicine. Vol. 4, No. 2, 2019, pp. 48-52. doi: 10.11648/j.ajlm.20190402.15
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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