Volume 2, Issue 6, November 2017, Page: 179-182
Determination of Antimicrobial Resistance of Enterobacteriaceae in Patients with Community Acquired Urinary Tract Infections
Abd Elrahman Mustafa Abd Elrahman Osman, Medical Laboratory Sciences Division, Port Sudan Ahlia College, Port Sudan, Sudan
Shingray Osman Hashim, Medical Laboratory Sciences Division, Port Sudan Ahlia College, Port Sudan, Sudan
Mohammed Abdall Musa, Medical Laboratory Sciences Division, Port Sudan Ahlia College, Port Sudan, Sudan
Omer Mohammed Tahir, Medical Laboratory Sciences Division, Port Sudan Ahlia College, Port Sudan, Sudan
Received: Nov. 2, 2017;       Accepted: Nov. 14, 2017;       Published: Jan. 4, 2018
DOI: 10.11648/j.ajlm.20170206.20      View  974      Downloads  40
Abstract
This study was conducted in Port Sudan city, Red Sea state during the period from January to June 2017 to investigate antimicrobial resistance of Enterobacteriaceae isolated from patients suffering from community acquired urinary tract infections. One hundred and fifty urine specimens were collected from patients attended Port Sudan Teaching Hospital. The specimens were cultured on blood agar and Mac Conkey's agar and Cystine Lysine Electrolyte deficient (CLED) agar for primary isolation of pathogens. Identification of the isolates was done by colonial morphology, Gram stain and Routine biochemical tests. Modified Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method was adopted to determine the resistance rate of Enterobacteriaceae to Imipenem, Ciprofloxacin, Chloramphenicol, Amikacin, Piperacillin, Tetracycline, Ceftazidime and Ticarcillin. Out one hundred and fifty urine specimens examined Enterobacteriaceae was detected in only 49(32.6%) specimens. The results revealed that the antimicrobial resistance of Enterobacteriaceae was as follows: Imipenem (6.1%), Ciprofloxacin (32.6%), Chloramphenicol (48.9%), Amikacin (61.2%), Piperacillin (79.5%), Tetracycline (83.6%), Ceftazidime (89.7%) and Ticarcillin (91.8%). Females were more affected than males (60%) and young adults were more affected than other age groups. Imipenem represented the least sensitive antimicrobial agent (6.1%), while Ticarcillin showed the highest resistance rate.
Keywords
Enterobacteriaceae, Urinary Tract Infections, CLED, Port Sudan
To cite this article
Abd Elrahman Mustafa Abd Elrahman Osman, Shingray Osman Hashim, Mohammed Abdall Musa, Omer Mohammed Tahir, Determination of Antimicrobial Resistance of Enterobacteriaceae in Patients with Community Acquired Urinary Tract Infections, American Journal of Laboratory Medicine. Vol. 2, No. 6, 2017, pp. 179-182. doi: 10.11648/j.ajlm.20170206.20
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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